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SONIC DEATH MONKEY SOUNDTRACK REVIEWS - Wedding Crashers

by Laura Kyle

The Wedding Crashers soundtrack is an upbeat, surprisingly respectable compilation of not-quite-emo rock songs. It fails to muster up nostalgia for the film and isn’t enjoyably goofy like the music in 40 Year-old Virgin, but it sure is a well-crafted playlist.

Wedding Crashers is a movie about two bachelors who are intent on not settling down. So it makes sense to kick things off with indie darlings Death Cab for Cutie and probably one of their most easygoing tunes, “Sound of Settling.”

Next up is Robbers on High Street’s “Love Underground,” a bouncy and pleasantly forgettable pop-rock song. The third track, “Aside,” is hardly my favorite from the Weakerthans, but it suits the tone of Wedding Crashers well and it’s got a nice little melody going for it. The fourth song on the soundtrack is “(Splash) Turn and Twist” by Jimmy Eat World, continuing the trend of energetic, but sorta plain rock songs. Ultra-cool Spoon follows that up with “Sister Jack,” which is equally likeable, however unremarkable. It has a real 60’s rock feel to it – you know, like it’s in between Elvis Rock ‘n Roll and Eagles soft rock.

“I Hope Tomorrow Is Like Today,” by Guster, reminds me of the sweeter tracks from the Weakerthans, which aren’t included on the soundtrack. So I’m glad this one’s here – it’s more sensitive than what's preceded and signals a change in mood and happens to make its appearance at the exactly right time.

The Wedding Crashers soundtrack takes a breather from the modern stuff with Mungo Jerry’s bluesy “In the Summertime” (the only hit the band ever made). And well, you really can’t go wrong there.

Bloc Party’s “This Modern Love” comes in at #8 and I don’t know much about Bloc Party, but I can tell they’ve got British accents. But they might be Russian for all I know, I was never good at detecting accents. I like this song; it’s simple and especially appropriate for Wedding Crashers.

Then it’s The Sounds (who also could be mistaken for being from across the pond, but I they’re actually Swedish) with “Rock ‘n Roll,” a super fun number with an irresistible beat – and despite the song title, it feels mostly like 80’s pop meets 21st century techno.

The Flaming Lips are welcome on any movie soundtrack so even though "Mr. Ambulance Driver" isn't one of their giddier numbers, I still appreciate it being here.

Well, we’ve already got The Sounds on the soundtrack, so why not include a song from The Sights? They’re contribution “Circus” sounds like it fell right out of the late 60’s or 70’s and it’s definitely my favorite track, if only for style.

The Long Winters' “Cinnamon” hints that the soundtrack (the film) is coming to a close, as it’s a lot like the first group of songs, softer and carefree, sporting romantic lyrics. And everyone knows that when a comedy starts to get romantic, well, it’s about to be over.

The always-awesome Rilo Keily takes the #13 slot, with “More Adventurous,” an agreeable, acoustic In Case You Didn’t Know, The Movie Really IS About To End song that even has some cool harmonica action.

“Shout” by the Isley Brothers is a safe, cheery way to end the soundtrack, especially one that accompanies a film about two guys who crash weddings. Because “Shout” has a 95% chance of being played at any wedding.

And as is expected for most comedies these days, the Wedding Crashers soundtrack actually ends with the cast singing some well-known song. This time it’s, fittingly, “Hava Nagilah,” but mostly it’s just instruments – you can hardly distinguish the voices of Owen Wilson or Vince Vaughn. Still, it’s a short and sweet closing.

The Wedding Crashers soundtrack may feel a bit ordinary at times, but it’s still an overachiever, featuring some of the best artists that modern music has to offer. It might be a lightweight when compared to the likes of the soundtracks to Garden State and In Good Company, but it’s a worthy purchase.


link directly to this feature at http://www.efilmcritic.com/feature.php?feature=1784
originally posted: 03/30/06 11:28:31
last updated: 03/31/06 04:41:33
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