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SONIC DEATH MONKEY Soundtrack Reviews - Burn After Reading

Burn the monkey.
by Michael Collins

The Coen Brothers and long time composer buddy Carter Burwell are back together for their latest collaboration, Burn After Reading.

Soundtrack composer, Carter Burwell, has been a long time collaborator with the Coen Brothers going back to Blood Simple in Ď84. When the Coen Brothers are on to a good thing they seem to stick to it. Despite the broad range of styles and feel the Coens produce in their films they keep on coming back to Burwell.

The soundtrack is an orchestral score which is high on mood and less interested in melody. There are various percussion instruments creating urgency in the music and there are strings-led surges of increasing volume to create a climax in feeling every so often.

And this goes on and on through out the soundtrack and, er, thatís about it.

Later tracks are different to the opening tracks, but itís following the same methods. Percussion, strings and surge. Repeat as required. Not that this is a completely bad thing.

The soundtrack generates a definite and consistent mood which means when you are in said mood you are going to feel like listening to this soundtrack all the way through. Most soundtracks are an emotional roller coasters that you canít possibly be in the mood for listening. Unless of course the mood youíre in is to recreate the twists, turns, valleys and peaks that are in the film itself. The second soundtrack to Baz Luhrmannís Romeo and Juliet is probably my favourite example of this. So we should give credit to the composer for producing a soundtrack that is actually listenable.

So when will you be listening to this? Well when youíre off doing something else more interesting thatís not going to require you spending too much time paying attention to the music. If not, you might think this is a little repetitive. Yet we all do something else while listening to music somewhere in the background. This soundtrack will be just fine for that.


link directly to this feature at http://www.efilmcritic.com/feature.php?feature=2579
originally posted: 10/03/08 11:27:28
last updated: 10/03/08 11:28:16
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