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SONIC DEATH MONKEY Soundtrack Reviews - Rocknrolla

rock-n-monkey
by Michael Collins

Can you go wrong with a soundtrack that called Rocknrolla? Read on and find out.

The Rocknrolla soundtrack opens brilliantly with an excerpt of dialogue from the film letting us know what this rock n roll business is all about. Using dialogue excerpts is a well worn technique, but this one is done well. It sets an ominous tone for the soundtrack and itís all the better for it. More dialogue is of course to follow through out the course of the soundtrack.

Black Strobe continue the tone with a swagger with Iím Your Man. Itís a low down dirty sound and thatís a good thing. The only thing sounding dirtier is the following track Have Love Will Travel by The Sonics. Things are dirty and mean in the neighbourhood of this soundtrack.

There are lots of great Clash songs one could put on a soundtrack. The one chosen here is Bank Robber. This is The Clash well and truly in their dub and reggae mode with Joe Strummer sounding as earnest, sincere and angst-ridden as he ever does. It might not be in my top 10 of favourite Clash songs (or even top 20), but itís a nicely produced track nevertheless.

The soundtrack is raw and dirty, but itís saved by tracks by some of the greats like the aforementioned Clash and later The Hives, Lou Reed (though his contribution is not exactly his best), The Subways and The English Beat. Yet that pace is difficult to keep up with in this genre and the album starts to show strain with some dodgy tracks. A case in point is, Trip by Kim Fowley which caused a little more pain than I am usually accustomed to subjecting my ears to.

Outlaw by War is not so bad I guess, but itís not something that Iím going to rush back and listen to again. I donít care how classic some of these tracks are, if I am not moved, Iím not moved. That especially goes for Flash and The Pan. Their effort is strictly for elevators. The Scientistsí We Had Love has to be deemed a failed experiment.

While this album had a promising beginning and well chosen and performed dialogue excerpts, the stand out tracks are not enough to get this album across the line. The raw garage sounds have a certain quality, but they are not enough to keep this listenerís attention.


link directly to this feature at http://www.efilmcritic.com/feature.php?feature=2591
originally posted: 10/16/08 15:52:53
last updated: 10/16/08 15:53:20
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