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What book are you reading, RIGHT now?
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Paulapalooza
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 20, 2002 3:17 pm    Post subject: What book are you reading, RIGHT now? Reply with quote

My answer:

Just finished Triggerfish Twist by one Mr. Tim Dorsey, Florida writer, who's basically Dave Barry doing lots of lines with Hunter S. Thompson, but in that friendly way.

Jaysis, rarely am I so amused by ANYTHING. And there's even a Clerks reference for all you VA fans out there.

Start with Florida Roadkill, his first book. Triggerfish Twist is his fourth, and is a flashback to when some of these characters were still alive, as a Dorsey character has roughly the life expectancy of a terrier outside a Korean eatery. They're roughly categorized as comedic mysteries, which I guess effectively they are, but you'll probably be laughing too hard to worry about any "mystery" segments.

Paul
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TheAngryJew
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 20, 2002 3:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm on the last tale in Poppy Z. Brite's Wormwood.

She's no Clive Barker, but tis pretty good stuff.
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UDM
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 20, 2002 3:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just got through reading Pauline Kael's Deeper into Movies, a collection of her movie reviews from 1969-1972. Amazing how cranky she is--hated Patton, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, A Clockwork Orange, The French Connection, Dirty Harry, and a bunch of other generally well-received movies. Also somewhat tiresome to hear her complain over and over about movies that are "literate in the worst way." But she is very articulate, and way ahead of all the summarize-the-plot-line critics out there.

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natasha_theobald
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 20, 2002 3:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm reading The Transcendent Unity of Religions, but I wrote your recommendations on my "to buy" list. Speaking of writers from Florida, I also enjoy Carl Hiaasen sometimes. Also, speaking of comedic mysteries, has anyone read The Liar by actor/author Stephen Fry? I guess it would fall into that category. I love it.

I always have a bookmark in a David Sedaris book, so that I can pick it up and read and reread anytime I need to laugh. Laughing
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Maegs
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 20, 2002 4:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In the tradition of intense readers I am reading several books. I usually keep a book in every room and one in my purse.

(living room) Last night I finished a lovely little historical novel, Anya Seton's Katherine. Its the tale of Katherine Swynford, the paramour of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster and the resulting Beaufort offspring who went into all the major homes of England and Castile.
(bedroom)
(purse) How to Be Good Nick Hornby continues to write some of the most biting, humorous and interesting books out there. What is that most human obsesstion to be good? Who decides what is good and what is just the motions? Rather than a philosophical tome, Hornby sharpens his pen to dig into characters who proport "goodness."
(bedroom) Life of the Party: The Biography of Pamela Digby Churchill Hayward Harriman. A dish of a biography that names names. Harriman spent the last century in the salons of Georgetown and the embassies of Paris, what a tale!

hmmmm upon further reflection I don't think I'm reading enough.

-M
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Slyder
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 20, 2002 8:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

reading now Leo Tolstoy's War And Peace

took him 5 years to write it, and I guess it'll take me 5 years to read it. Razz
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The Guv'nor
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 20, 2002 10:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Declare by Tim Powers. It's a bit of a slog, but the man who wrote the masterpiece that was The Stress of Her Regard deserves a little patience.

Guv
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sporkgirl
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 21, 2002 12:27 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

/me is reading the new bill bryson. tis good. also trying to get through interview with the vampire, which is rough going, partly because she improved so much with time and also because i read all the others so i already knows what happens, but i feel obligated.
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The Guv'nor
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 21, 2002 5:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

What new Bill Bryson? Do you mean Down Under?

(I think it's got a different name in the US).

Guv
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sporkgirl
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PostPosted: Wed Aug 21, 2002 6:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

nope, new new. it's a guide for writers. it was on the new in non fiction table at the barnes and nobles. here's the link from bn.com:

"Bryson's Dictionary of Troublesome Words: A Writer's Guide to Getting It Right"


http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?userid=52ZOXACMBZ&isbn=0767910427

hopefully that link will work. otherwise, search for bill bryson. also, i loved down under ("in a sunburnt country" in the us) but "the lost continent" is still my favorite. i want to grow up to be as cool as him, and the fame and fortune wouldn't hurt either.
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Kyle



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PostPosted: Wed Aug 21, 2002 9:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The last time I read a book was about 3 months ago, and that was Misery. Damn good. Beats the hell out of the movie, which wasn't all that great to begin with.
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Paulapalooza
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 22, 2002 1:50 pm    Post subject: Update Reply with quote

'Kay, so I'm sitting around Nahvegas without much to do, so I've been hittin' the books hard. I just finished writing a review of Tim Dorsey's Triggerfish Twist and Bill Fitzhugh's Fender Benders, and I've since read this stuff:

Cast in Stone by G.M. Ford. This is the second in the Seattle-set Leo Waterman mysteries. On the very good side of average, but it's set in the city where I lived for a year. Cool and compelling everyman protagonist. Start with Who in Hell is Wanda Fuca?

Coraline by Neil Gaiman. This was a quick re-read as I'm reviewing it and John Shirley's Demons together for my next bit of paid-not-enough writing. It's ostensibly a children's book, but it actually works well enough as a creepy, well-written read for adults, too. And if you're a Gaiman fan, you're going to read everything he's done, anyway.

Shooting At Midnight by Greg Rucka is the current read, about half-done. This is his fourth novel, and a slight departure from his normal leading man, bodyguard character Atticus Kodiak, though Atticus is there as a supporting character. Probably better know for his comic book work, including stints on Batman in Detective Comics and the excellent, excellent Whiteout and Queen and Country, Rucka is one of the best writer of character I've ever encountered, and he's easily one of the best thriller guys in the business. Shame he doesn't get more ink. Start with Keeper.

Next up will likely be Tim Powers' Anubis Gates. Anything to add on Powers, Guv?

Paul
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PostPosted: Thu Aug 22, 2002 3:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Once again, my propensity towards non-fiction has got the best of me.

I'm reading Digital Resistance - Explorations in Tactical Media. I get a sampler pack now and again from a small press distributor and that was in it along with Punk Planet - the Collected Interviews, which I already have and San Francisco Beat - Talking With The Poets.

Digital Resistance is a heavy handed tome that makes some salient points about social signifiers but falls into the trap of sensational leftism. Part-manifesto, part-instructional guidebook, its ultra-radical approach is almost a pornographic read. It reads like it was written under the gun in the shadows of a Big Brother like society.

A discussion of art, language, semiotics and consciousness would have been a better background to launch into an examination of the Dada-ists, the 60's era Haight Ashbury Diggers, and the Fluxus Group with roughly the same result except, from the perspective of Digital Resistance, that would be pandering to the knowledge machine enslaved by capitalism and priveleging academic discourse over working class discourse.

And we are already in the trap of vocabulary. How many times do you hear people analyzing discourse at the laundromat?

The hypocrisy is that the writers of the book come out of a rigourous academic dissection of the the systems they now hope to subvert in some romantic fantasy by using plain language to indoctrinate the "Working Class Resistor".

Resistance, does, however, offer a compelling alternative perspective on unquestioned social beliefs.

My favorite chapter is the manual on "Graffiti Robots". Building and programming remote controlled robot messengers as a method for infilitrating "militarized social space" and create critical messages of resistance. Someone has their contingency plan all worked out. But you know, there are, and have been, places in the world, where such a thing is not a ludicrous proposition.

Maybe the CIA wrote this book as a field guide for operatives attempting to undo Socialist countries behind the orange curtain by training Freedom Fighters.

The most dangerous chapter: Children as Tactical Media Participants. While the advertising world has long been conditioning children to become stalwart consumers, projecting cliche' social narratives and a simple "creat desire, create mechanism to fulfill desire, fulfill desire" scenario in an imperialistic drive towards mindshare and future profits - those without access to widespread socializing platforms may take a more personal approach. A general criticism of the lack of responsibility capital has shown towards child development would be more to the point, but the bit about hacking Game Boy is an interesting spin on the subject.

Ah yes. Children. The Zombie Slaves of Capitalism Must Be Liberated!

Published by Autonomedia, who also published Hacktivisim - Network Art Activism,Forbidden Sacraments - the Survival of Shamanism in Western Civilization, Surrealist Subversions and Grass - The Companion Book to the Documentary Film.
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 23, 2002 3:02 pm    Post subject: I'm like Maegs. Reply with quote

Okay, in no order of preference, because whether they get my attention on any pre-sleep evening hour depends entirely on my mood at the time, but I'm reading all of these.

The History of Japan : After having read the Hagakure (twice), Rashomon, and the Art of War, Jim Jarmusch's Ghost Dog: Way of the Samurai is still having an effect on my reading habits.

A Simple Plan : Didn't dig the movie anywhere near as much as everyone else on the planet, so figured maybe I missed something. And as it turns out, maybe I missed something.

Fear and Loathing in America: The Gonzo Papers, Volume 2 : There's always, ALWAYS, a Hunter S. Thompson book by my bed. Without fail. And this one seems to so closely follow my career as a freelancer right about now that it's freaking me out kinda.

Age and Guile Beat Youth, Inexperience and a Bad Haircut : PJ O'Rourke is a perennial favorite of mine. Though it's hard to find his stuff sometimes (various bookstores treat him like Hunter S - they can't decide if he's humor, political, non-fiction or fiction), he's a liberal's non-liberal, and a damn funy one at that.

The Portable Henry Rollins : Sometimes a guy just needs to growl at the world.
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y2mckay
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 24, 2002 8:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Legends of the Samurai by Hiroaki Sato.
- What can I say. Oz, i'm with you on the "Ghost Dog", Dogg. Also, I've seen Seven Samurai, Sanjuro, Yojimbo, Hanzo: The Razor, and the Lone Wolf and Cub series about a thousand times, collectively.

The Art of Asylum-Keeping: Thomas Story Kirkbride and the Origins of American Psychiatry by Nancy Tomes
- I got interested in this subject after watching my current favorite horror movie Session 9 and then reading about the abandoned Danvers Asylum on the internet.

If Chins Could Kill by Bruce Campbell.
- Bruce is da fucking MAN! Funny stuff, though I wish he'd thrown in a few more Evil Dead stories.

The Dark Knight Strikes Again by Frank Miller and Lynn Varley.
-My one comic book indulgence. I think Miller's art work, for the most part, looks like technicolor vomit, but I love the story. All the characters are so larger than life and pretentiously noble yet dark and brooding. I like it in spite of myself.

Eyes of the Shadow by Maxwell Grant
-Volume 2 in the incredibly prolific series of "The Shadow" pulp novels from the 1930's. Unfortunately, it's just an ebook version on my PDA, not a first edition print. Incredibly dated with deus ex machinas out the ass (how does the Shadow always know when to show up just in time to stop the bad guys? Because . . . because he just KNOWS, Okay!?), but still a fun read.

Hollywood Haunted: A Ghostly Tour of Filmland by various authors.
-I love stories about Hollywood, I love Ghost stories. "You've got peanut butter in my chocolate! No, you've got chocolate in my peanut butter!"
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Kyle



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PostPosted: Sat Aug 24, 2002 10:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just read Different Seasons by Stephen King. It's not all great, but has some strikingly original and fun stories (Dolan's Cadillac), some campy ones (The Moving Finger), and the shortest and my personal favorite, The Fifth Quarter. It's a very Tarantino-ish crime story thats too short to be played out well on the big screen, but a terrific story nonetheless. I strongly suggest you go rent it just for that story alone.
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Oz
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 24, 2002 11:42 pm    Post subject: Fuckin' A, McKay! Reply with quote

Count me in as a serial samurai watcher on all those counts. Every seen the One Armed Boxer series? Or have I asked that before? Funny funny funny stuff.
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y2mckay
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 25, 2002 5:20 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I may have seen someting from the One Armed Boxer series. It sounds familiar. Unfortunately, I haven't seen most of this stuff since I was a kid and they used to show it on late night TV. Now I seem to have to scour the earth to find a Samurai flick I haven't seen, especially in the DVD format. I do remember seeing the Zatoichi series a lot, and stuff like that. It rather sucks that I used to be able to find Samurai and Kung Fu flicks on the tube all the time growing up, and now you don't see it anywhere unless it's some Jackie Chan piece of shit.
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Danielle Ophelia



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PostPosted: Mon Aug 26, 2002 8:48 am    Post subject: Myself? Reply with quote

An anthology of short horror stories. I've always been partial to those.
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y2mckay
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 26, 2002 2:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Me too. What's the name? Any prominent authors?
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Oz
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 26, 2002 4:35 pm    Post subject: Drifting, but still. Reply with quote

McKay, have you ever seen La Samourai? I'll be damned if I can find it anywhere, but Jarmusch swears by it.
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 26, 2002 5:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

damn, I've never even heard of it. I typed "La Samourai" in the search engine at IMDB and it pulled up "Ghost Dog" WTF? What have you heard about this movie?

I also stumbled across this. Looks like it may have potential: http://us.imdb.com/Plot?0325710
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y2mckay
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 26, 2002 5:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

BTW, that last post was me. Accept no substitutions! Twisted Evil
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Paulapalooza
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 27, 2002 5:46 pm    Post subject: horror anthologies Reply with quote

An anthology of short horror stories. I've always been partial to those.

y2mckay wrote:
Me too. What's the name? Any prominent authors?


While I have no idea what Dani's reading and shan't speak for her, a really good horror anthology, most likely out of print, sadly, is Midnight Graffiti, a collection of stories that originally appeared in the pages of the magazine of the same name. It features your standard King and Ellison, and a buncha other people like Nancy Collins, David Schow, Dan Simmons, and Joe R. Lansdale. No Poppy Z. Brite, sadly, enough, but this may have been a few years before she was first published. As TAJ would probably tell you, her short stories are highly recommended.

Anyway, good stuff.

Paul
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y2mckay
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 27, 2002 6:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sounds pretty good. I'll look for it on amazon. Anything with stories in it by King, Ellison, AND Lansdale is definitely worthwhile. Anybody in here read any of Joe R. Lansdale's stuff? I still gotta pick up the latest Hap and Leonard story.

Another good anthology I read a while ago was called "Shock Rock" (I think). It was a bunch of horror stories with rock and roll themes. There was a decent story by King in there, and most of the others were good, though I don't remember authors
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