More in-depth film festival coverage than any other website!
Home Reviews  Articles  Release Dates Coming Soon  DVD  Top 20s Criticwatch  Search
Public Forums  Festival Coverage  Contests About 
Advertisement

Overall Rating
3.65

Awesome: 0%
Worth A Look65%
Average: 35%
Pretty Bad: 0%
Total Crap: 0%

3 reviews, 2 user ratings


Latest Reviews

Predestination by Jay Seaver

Faults by Jay Seaver

Lucy by Brett Gallman

Kumiko, the Treasure Hunter by Jay Seaver

And So It Goes by Peter Sobczynski

Huntresses, The by Jay Seaver

Fatal Encounter, The by Jay Seaver

No Tears for the Dead by Jay Seaver

In Order of Disappearance by Jay Seaver

Cheatin' by Jay Seaver

subscribe to this feed


Hunting Party, The (2007)
[AllPosters.com] Buy posters from this movie
by Peter Sobczynski

"Gere And Howard Find Laughs On The Road To Hell"
4 stars

Genocide and ethnic cleansing are not often considered to be among the most promising building blocks for big-screen wackiness, but in the case of the jet-black comedy “The Hunting Party,” these elements serve as the inspiration for an often-hilarious film that will no doubt amuse and anger you in equal doses.

Set in Sarajevo in 2000, the film stars Richard Gere as a former network correspondent whose career went up in flames a few years earlier while doing a live remote from war-torn Bosnia. When his former cameraman (Terrence Howard) arrives to film a network puff piece, Gere convinces him and a young tag-along (Jesse Eisenberg) that he knows the hidden location of the country’s top war criminal, a mysterious figure known as The Fox, and that they should track him down and either interview him or capture him themselves. Unfortunately for them, as they travel through the war-ravaged nation–encountering ruined towns (including the former Olympic Village), bands of armed thugs and U.N. representatives who have a hundred different ways of explaining why they aren’t doing anything about stopping the violence or tracking down The Fox–the three are mistaken for a CIA hit squad out to bring down The Fox and he goes on the move while trying to hunt down his own pursuers.

As I said before, the basic material of “The Hunting Party,” inspired by an “Esquire” article about a real-life incident, is not inherently funny but in the hands of writer-director Richard Shepard (his follow-up to the acclaimed 2005 comedy “The Matador”), it has been transformed into an amusingly zonked-out black comedy/road picture in the manner of Oliver Stone’s great 1986 film “Salvador.” Like that film, “The Hunting Party is an angry work that rages against both those who advocate and indulge in unthinkable atrocities against their fellow man for the most tenuous of reasons and those who allow such things to happen by refusing to anything about them for fear of making waves. And like that film, Shepard realizes that the best way to convey that in the context of a feature film that the average viewer would be able to endure without plunging into total despair, is to approach it in a darkly humorous manner. Watching these three guys blundering into incredibly dangerous situations and trying get out of them with nothing more than words and sheer nerve makes for a number of tense and funny situations that demonstrate that few things in the world are more amusing than people trying to apply logic to situations were logic has long since taken leave. (In case you doubt the truthfulness of this story–the opening title card reads “Only the most ridiculous parts are true”–I urge you to stay for the end credits as they not only reveal how much of the film actually occurred, they even show you where participants in the real events can be found in the film version.)

Although all the performances in “The Hunting Party” are good, the one that really drives the film along is the high-wire act performed by Richard Gere. Over the years, he has generally been one of the more aloof actors around but with both this film and this spring’s “The Hoax,” he has found a way to combine the edgy and youthful energy that he brought to such early films as “Days of Heaven” and “Breathless” with the more seasoned and mature tone of his later work and the result is one of the most exciting performances that he has ever given–like the film it boosts, it is an alternately nervy, anguished and hilarious turn that truly deserves to be seen.

link directly to this review at http://www.efilmcritic.com/review.php?movie=16539&reviewer=389
originally posted: 09/21/07 14:00:00
[printer] printer-friendly format  

User Comments

2/22/10 mr.mike The 3 leads carry it well , despite some unconvincing detours. 4 stars
9/16/07 JEANY SANCHEZ scary movie 3 stars
IF YOU'VE SEEN THIS FILM, RATE IT!
Note: Duplicate, 'planted,' or other obviously improper comments
will be deleted at our discretion. So don't bother posting 'em. Thanks!
Your Name:
Your Comments:
Your Location: (state/province/country)
Your Rating:


Discuss this movie in our forum

USA
  07-Sep-2007 (R)
  DVD: 08-Jan-2008

UK
  23-Nov-2007

Australia
  N/A




Home Reviews  Articles  Release Dates Coming Soon  DVD  Top 20s Criticwatch  Search
Public Forums  Festival Coverage  Contests About 
eFilmCritic.com: Australia's Largest Movie Review Database.
Privacy Policy | HBS Inc. | |   

All data and site design copyright 1997-2014, HBS Entertainment, Inc.
Search for
reviews features movie title writer/director/cast