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Quarantine 2: Terminal
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by Adrian Starland

"Hopefully, the "Subtitle" is a Welcome Hint"
3 stars

The "double entendre" title hopefully also hints at a "triple entendre" which suggests that there will be no attempts made at expanding this storyline into a "trilogy."

Without question, the whole "P.O.V." gimmick is beginning to run out of steam and is beginning to become a cliché in & of its own right, much like the "Vengeful Ghost" wave from Eastern & Southeastern Asia only a few short years ago. This realization becomes even more self-evident given the fact that mine has (to date) literally been the ONLY critical review on this site of the recent offering, "Grave Encounters" (which had had a VOD release date of August 25 of this year, saw "theatrical" release on September 9th, and is already being advertised on sites such as DVD Universe and Amazon.com with a scheduled DVD release date of October 18th... definitely not a good sign), and now, just a few short minutes ago, after having engaged in a bit of random browsing throughout the site as "time-wasting filler" while waiting for another project to finish processing (sorry, guys, but I've got to be honest), I've discovered that another such movie I'd seen close to its original release date – "Quarantine 2: Terminal" – had likewise not been showered with "any" attention... "positive" or "negative"; it was just sort of "left there" in the closet to remain hidden away from everyone's sight like an unwanted & ignored bastard stepchild.

It was simultaneously a surprise and not really that much of a surprise that no one else felt any sort of a tug to review this sequel to the American remake of Spain's well-received horror mockumentary, "[•Rec]"

Of course, those of us who are familiar with this film's predecessor, "Quarantine," are well aware that this cannot possibly be a "direct sequel" which follows the action from where we left off, so naturally this movie constitutes a "branch" or "story arc" of the events associated with that previous film. This time, the "threat" is confined to a jet airliner when an illegally smuggled "vector" literally leaves its mark and, in expected fashion, all hell breaks loose.

Things get a pretty intense "jumpstart" while the aircraft is gliding through the friendly skies, until the situation heats up enough to prompt an emergency landing. But once the pilots have taxied up to the boarding ramp the entire cast of passengers & crew find themselves unceremoniously sealed off within an empty section of the airport with no way out. Before long they are made aware of why they are being held, but this doesn't stop this unfortunate group from trying to escape – especially when they begin witnessing their situation rapidly beginning to resemble scenes which look and feel like a rehash of the "Dawn of the Dead" remake.

Because of this movie's giving their players too much room to move & breathe, gone is the dreaded "claustrophobic" feel we were initially expecting, and thus the tension of its predecessor is not really there, and so this movie is, in a sense, too "hopeful" and without enough "uncertainty" to fully maintain our emotional involvement. The premise is also a little weak and too contrived. And of course there's the royal "cheat" at the end (yes, it involves the premise of the "sole survivor" who defeats all the odds... and naturally you'd lose everything betting "against" this one, as American film makers are still such major wimps & pussies regarding this ubiquitous cliché-squared: some things shall just forever remain taboo, I suppose), though they're to be granted at least half a credit for not making it a "survivor-at-the-end" cliché "two-fer," as they'd made it seem that they were leading up to.

Apart from a few well-executed tense scenes, "Quarantine 2" really does not have all that much going for it, and it would be somewhat of a stretch to consider this one a worthy successor to the earlier story it's based on. This in no way means that "Q2" is a horrible movie; in fact, it can be rather entertaining (in a "not-fully engaged" sort of way), but it is easily a "forgettable" movie, one which finds itself easily lost among the ever expanding sea of the POV/"pseudocumentary" genre offerings.

link directly to this review at http://www.efilmcritic.com/review.php?movie=23020&reviewer=427
originally posted: 09/21/11 19:50:15
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USA
  17-Jun-2011 (R)
  DVD: 02-Aug-2011

UK
  N/A

Australia
  N/A


Directed by
  John Pogue

Written by
  John Pogue

Cast
  Mercedes Masöhn
  Josh Cooke
  Mattie Liptak
  Ignacio Serricchio
  Noree Victoria



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