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Overall Rating
2.44

Awesome: 0%
Worth A Look: 16.67%
Average: 11.11%
Pretty Bad72.22%
Total Crap: 0%

2 reviews, 6 user ratings



Unbroken
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by Rob Gonsalves

"The Passion of the American."
2 stars

“If you can take it, you can make it,” says the helpful brother of Louis Zamperini (Jack O’Connell) early in 'Unbroken,' giving us, though not Louis, an idea of what we’re in for.

What does it take — what fortitude, what inner reserves of strength or patience — to make it to the end of Unbroken? The first hour cuts back and forth between Louis’ pre-war life as just the fastest, bestest runner you ever saw, and Louis as a bombardier in World War II, before his plane goes down in the ocean and he and two fellow soldiers survive on a raft for forty-seven days. Then the raft bumps into a Japanese warship. From there, you will spend the next sixty-five minutes with Louis in a POW camp and then a colder POW camp.

These epics (usually singing the praises of the Greatest Generation) that make a virtue of endurance always make the mistake of demanding endurance of the audience as well. There’s an element of shaming in this: If Louis Zamperini could spend years of his life being tortured in a POW camp, you can spend two hours of yours watching him being tortured, you non-Greatest Generation pussies. Based on a bestseller by Laura Hillenbrand, Unbroken has attracted a lot of intelligent talent: a run of screenwriters (William Nicholson, then Richard LaGravenese, then Joel and Ethan Coen) and director Angelina Jolie, and it’s hard to say what enticed any of them. The movie is about a man who suffers and perseveres and survives, and it isn’t about anything other than that.

Well, maybe it is: it’s also about homoerotic sadism, a theme that most every prison yarn is good for, even after Jean Genet’s Un Chant D’Amour made it explicit in 1950. Louis draws the eye of Mutsuhiro Watanabe (Miyavi), aka “the Bird,” a POW sergeant who takes out his career frustration on the allied prisoners and especially on tough, attractive Louis. This sadist looks and acts feminine and sometimes seems to be leching after Louis; after a while, nobody else in the camp interests Watanabe — he only has eyes for Louis. This all is drawn crudely, with none of the formal tension of something like Merry Christmas, Mr. Lawrence. I haven’t read the book — did the born-again Louis make as much of Watanabe’s fixation on him as the film does? Jolie, good liberal that she is, presents the dynamic but mutes it. As it is, Watanabe represents nothing but grinning sadism, as Louis stands for nothing but stoic American Christian resilience.

After the CIA torture report has come to light, it’s amusing that an epic about the spiritual value of enduring torture should become the country’s big Christmas Day release. Is Louis meant to be our very own American Christ, suffering for humanity’s sins and then forgiving his tormentors (as we’re told at the end, in some onscreen text that might’ve made for a more interesting film than the one we’ve just sat through)? Jolie straight-up turns Louis into Jesus at one point, when Louis, carrying a heavy plank over his head, casts a cruciform shadow on the soil of the prison camp. Louis hefting the plank is also the central image of the marketing. What’s actually going on here?

Those who made this long, grinding tribute to The Passion of the American may find the question hurtful, but I say if you make it, you can take it.

link directly to this review at http://www.efilmcritic.com/review.php?movie=25966&reviewer=416
originally posted: 02/05/15 10:53:37
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User Comments

11/04/15 Cary Graham The brash, cold cynicism of this review is over the top. See Unbroken & decide for yourself 4 stars
10/31/15 BigWig Started out so engaging and looking great; by the end, I was like, "Fuck yous"... 3 stars
8/17/15 Victoria Disappointing. No character development. Camera work amatureish. 2 stars
1/15/15 Langano Good, not great. 3 stars
1/01/15 Bob Dog It's hardly a holiday charmer - but it's dark reflective survival story is well told. 4 stars
12/26/14 PAUL SHORTT COMPETENT, INSPIRING, WELL-CRAFTED BIOPIC WITH GOOD PERFORMANCES 4 stars
IF YOU'VE SEEN THIS FILM, RATE IT!
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USA
  25-Dec-2014 (PG-13)
  DVD: 24-Mar-2015

UK
  N/A

Australia
  25-Dec-2014
  DVD: 25-Mar-2015




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