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Overall Rating
4.72

Awesome82.76%
Worth A Look: 10.34%
Average: 3.45%
Pretty Bad: 3.45%
Total Crap: 0%

3 reviews, 11 user ratings


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Spotlight
[AllPosters.com] Buy posters from this movie
by Rob Gonsalves

"Crackerjack journalism drama."
5 stars

Various representatives of the Catholic Church have given a thumbs-up to "Spotlight," a docudrama about Boston Globe reporters breaking the story of the Church’s cover-up of scores of abuses by Boston priests.

Well, how else is the Church going to react to it? Condemning the film would be fantastic free publicity; praising it is brilliant tactical aikido against possible new detractors of the Church. Anyway, I happen to agree with the fine film critics at the Vatican and the Boston Archdiocese. Spotlight is an undemonstrative journalistic almost-thriller with an even but urgent heartbeat, driven as much by reporters’ need for their paper to be first to crack the story as by actual concern for truth, justice, and the American way. We are, for example, asked to be horrified at the idea of the Herald getting its sulfurous, tabloidy claws into this once-in-a-generation scoop.

The movie takes its name from the Globe’s elite investigative team, instituted in 1970, known for its devotion to going deep on afflicting-the-powerful stories and taking its sweet time getting there. Here, they don’t have much sweet time. The new editor, Marty Baron (Liev Schreiber), makes a pitch to Spotlight commander Walter “Robby” Robinson (Michael Keaton): why not look into this business about Father John Geoghan abusing children and Cardinal Law dealing with it by reassigning Geoghan and keeping silent? The team — rounded out by passionate Mike Rezendes (Mark Ruffalo), compassionate Sacha Pfeiffer (Rachel McAdams), and dogged Matt Carroll (Brian D’Arcy James) — swings into action, soon finding that the story extends far more broadly than only one priest playing Musical Parishes.

A welcoming round of applause for the return of director/cowriter Tom McCarthy, who emerges unbloodied from his prior experience on the Adam Sandler flop The Cobbler. This is indeed the kind of “small” (well, $20 million is small these days) mid-budget drama for adults that seems so endangered now; technically, it’s an indie production, distributed by Open Road, owned by theatrical giants AMC and Regal. McCarthy, who has roots in indie comedy-drama, gives us a film that looks like television without really feeling like it; the conflicts feel major even as McCarthy and writing partner Josh Singer mostly avoid melodrama. The few encounters with victims, now grown, of pedophile priests are handled with tact but with a steady eye for relevant detail; one man shows us, almost too quickly to catch, needle tracks on his arm. The men look haunted, mutilated in their souls; they stare inward into hell.

It was a hell that few knew or cared to know about. The Spotlight team has an unwilling ally in abrupt, irascible lawyer Mitchell Garabedian (Stanley Tucci), who has zero patience for adults but, we discover in a late scene, all the affectionate patience in the world for his young clients who have suffered abuse. Muddying the moral waters a bit is a meeting with a molesting priest who cheerfully admits to his crimes, because he doesn’t consider what he did to be rape; rape is what happened to him. The movie doesn’t clarify whether he, too, was a boyhood victim of a priest, and whether some victims of abuse become tireless advocates for justice while others, their souls incinerated, continue the cycle of abuse themselves. A psychologist and ex-priest, played as a phone-voice of authority by an unbilled Richard Jenkins, suggests that the problem with the Church stems from psychosexual deformity caused by celibacy — or does the priesthood, and other positions of trust like school coaches, attract the psychosexually deformed? Spotlight gets us thinking about that, but ultimately leaves the answer to other movies (I recommend, for starters, the two-part powerhouse The Boys of St. Vincent).

Decently, it focuses on the victims, and why there continued to be victims for so long.

link directly to this review at http://www.efilmcritic.com/review.php?movie=29308&reviewer=416
originally posted: 02/03/16 06:19:07
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OFFICIAL SELECTION: 2015 Venice Film Festival For more in the 2015 Venice Film Festival series, click here.
OFFICIAL SELECTION: 2015 Toronto International Film Festival For more in the 2015 Toronto International Film Festival series, click here.
OFFICIAL SELECTION: 2015 Chicago International Film Festival For more in the 2015 Chicago International Film Festival series, click here.
OFFICIAL SELECTION: 2015 Savannah Film Festival For more in the 2015 Savannah Film Festival series, click here.
OFFICIAL SELECTION: 2015 Hawaii International Film Festival For more in the 2015 Hawaii International Film Festival series, click here.

User Comments

7/19/16 TdW Very good 4 stars
6/29/16 Jamie Great movie, superb acting. Loved it! 5 stars
5/20/16 Emaronh good movies, no doubt 4 stars
4/21/16 Nick Worth the praise, I would give it 4.5 stars if allowed, but Ill go with 5 5 stars
3/21/16 Frenzy Just ok 3 stars
2/27/16 Toni Excellent one of if not the best movie of the year 5 stars
2/02/16 Maria “If it takes a village to raise a child, it takes a village to abuse one.” 5 stars
2/01/16 Luisa Very moving, well acted, well made. I won't be able to go to church for a while. 5 stars
1/23/16 Langano Well done. 4 stars
12/06/15 Bob Dog Nothing a TV docudrama couldn't have done better. 2 stars
12/06/15 PAUL SHORTT SHARP, COMPELLING AND WELL ACTED 5 stars
IF YOU'VE SEEN THIS FILM, RATE IT!
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USA
  06-Nov-2015 (R)
  DVD: 23-Feb-2016

UK
  N/A

Australia
  06-Nov-2015
  DVD: 23-Feb-2016




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