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Overall Rating
4.35

Awesome47.83%
Worth A Look: 39.13%
Average: 13.04%
Pretty Bad: 0%
Total Crap: 0%

2 reviews, 11 user ratings


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Blade Runner 2049
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by Rob Gonsalves

"Time to live."
4 stars

There’s a lot to say about "Blade Runner 2049," the long-gestating sequel to the 1982 cult classic, but here’s my initial thought: see it, don’t see it, but know that something like this — a downbeat, two-hour-and-forty-four-minute, expensive (anywhere from $150 to $185 million), R-rated work of art — will not come along again any time soon. (Especially because its opening-weekend take was “only” $31 million, which is thought to be disastrous.)

Eccentricities like this will be lost in time, as someone once said, like tears in rain. More than once, I was stirred by an image or a subtly broken line reading or the thunderous, doomy soundtrack. It’s a little baffling, though, how little of it has stayed with me — except in isolated shards of sound or picture.

That’s because Blade Runner 2049, like its dour predecessor, is a bitter tone poem about humanity’s pros and cons rather than an adventure or a mystery. It continues the vision of the hellish dystopian city that the first film practically invented, and expands on it somewhat, taking us further out from the slums of L.A. (Master cinematographer Roger Deakins nurtures beauty where the first film found mostly ugliness.) In both cases the plot doesn’t matter as much as the thematic and visual heaviosity the plot makes possible. The mission of the protagonist — K (Ryan Gosling), a replicant whose job is to find and retire previous iterations of replicants — is defined mainly by where the plot needs him to be. A buried skeleton has been found, and markings on the bones determine that the owner of the skeleton was (A) a replicant and (B) pregnant. K must wipe out all evidence of this birth, including whoever the child is.

If you’re paying all that much attention to the plot, you may sit there getting annoyed at the movie for making you pretend not to have guessed the film’s big twist long before the movie pulls a mild fake-out by saying “Nope, that twist isn’t true,” but then it turns out to be true anyway. (I think.) That sound you hear is Blade Runner 2049 brutally dismantling about half of the Blade Runner fandom’s most earnest theories, but it slyly leaves intact the biggest one of all — that the first film’s anti-hero, Rick Deckard (Harrison Ford), a killer of replicants, was himself a replicant. Deckard was never a source of laughs (except when he posed as a dweeby inspector to gain backstage access to a replicant he was hunting), but when Ford appears well into the second hour of BR 2049, he brings some dry levity with him. Before that it’s mostly the po-faced adventures of Ryan, the Boy Who Isn’t a Real Boy. Gosling holds the screen capably, occasionally giving it up to livelier, usually female presences like Robin Wright as K’s hard-bitten superior officer and Sylvia Hoeks as Luv, a fearsome replicant who seems to have stepped out of a Frank Miller comic — Ronin, maybe.

Ronin, of course, like about five million other things, was heavily influenced by the original Blade Runner. The sequel wisely gets the first film’s iconic visuals out of the way quickly, and it doesn’t feel like a fan film but like a legitimate addition to canon. Like other films directed by Denis Villeneuve, it’s hushed and long and will put considerable pressure on some viewers’ patience. But I enjoyed its meditative tempo, and the way it uses violence is as upsetting as in the first Blade Runner but not as freaky and mean-spirited. The general tone of the original was fear and rage blended into a melange of futuristic noir; the tone of 2049 is sadness, loneliness, largely due to living in a society ruled by privilege and hubris. Everyone is walled off from everyone else, one person literally; the movie ends up saying that humanity isn’t all that important if artificial intelligence can create a better humanity. Cool story, bro!

But as an experience of severe imagery and soundscape, "2049" delivers. Someday on Blu-ray it will be the go-to movie for the attuned to float around in for almost three hours, getting stoned on the bitter and doom-laden toxic mood.

link directly to this review at http://www.efilmcritic.com/review.php?movie=30562&reviewer=416
originally posted: 10/12/17 10:17:34
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User Comments

12/07/17 Tony Nguyen Inconsistent but enjoyable 3 stars
11/28/17 Dan A spectacular movie! With an intense score and sound, this movie has set a high water mark. 5 stars
11/25/17 Raoul Duke Worthy sequel - suspect it will have the slow burn longevity of the original 5 stars
11/13/17 Batgirl Astonishing, unmittigated genius from first frame to last. 5 stars
10/25/17 Charles Tatum A stunning masterpiece, one of the best films of all-time. 5 stars
10/24/17 Koitus Needed more background on courtesan. And, not a fan of the late "plot twist..." 3 stars
10/24/17 Paul Meade Loved it, visuals and sound were great. Story was decent, worth seeing. 4 stars
10/22/17 G A very worthy follow-up! 4 stars
10/20/17 T R U T H Better than the first, if less visually arresting. 4 stars
10/09/17 ActionMovieFan A supreme masterwork of unmittigated cinematic genius beyond your wildest imagination!. 5 stars
10/07/17 Bob Dog Consistent but unnecessary sequel. 3 stars
IF YOU'VE SEEN THIS FILM, RATE IT!
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USA
  06-Oct-2017

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Australia
  06-Oct-2017




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