More in-depth film festival coverage than any other website!
Home Reviews  Articles  Release Dates Coming Soon  DVD  Top 20s Criticwatch  Search
Public Forums  Festival Coverage  Contests About 
Advertisement

Overall Rating
3.81

Awesome33.96%
Worth A Look33.96%
Average: 13.21%
Pretty Bad: 16.98%
Total Crap: 1.89%

5 reviews, 23 user ratings


Latest Reviews

Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets by Rob Gonsalves

Roman J. Israel, Esq. by Peter Sobczynski

Coco (2017) by Peter Sobczynski

Prey (2017) by Jay Seaver

Lu Over the Wall by Jay Seaver

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri by alejandroariera

Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri by Peter Sobczynski

Justice League by Peter Sobczynski

Mumon: The Land of Stealth by Jay Seaver

Geek Girls by Jay Seaver

subscribe to this feed


Iris (2002)
[AllPosters.com] Buy posters from this movie
by Charles Tatum

"The mind's eye"
4 stars

A beautifully acted film, "Iris" will hit home, especially with anyone who has lost a family member to Alzheimer's Disease.

The film is split into two different stories, whose scenes interchange throughout. Iris Murdoch (Judi Dench) is a respected novelist in England, living with her English professor husband, John Bayley (Jim Broadbent). She goes on speaking engagements, with her husband by her side. She begins to have lapses in thought, unable to use her beloved mastery of language to finish novels, then conversations, then sentences, then words. Her deterioration is sudden, rapid, and sad, taking their obvious toll on Iris as well as her husband, who gets more and more frustrated with every one of Iris' setbacks.

Young Iris (Kate Winslet) is a free spirit at Oxford who has just written her first novel, which has been accepted for publication. She meets the awkward, almost bumbling Young John (Hugh Bonneville), and something about him attracts her, but she continues to see other men (and possibly at least one woman). Despite her friends' opinions of this strange man, Iris begins to open up to him, letting him into her literary world. The two form a bond that we see lasts through Iris' battle with her illness.

I am not familiar with Bayley or Murdoch's work, but the film has certainly peaked my interest. Richard Eyre directs the film brilliantly, intercutting the two stories without getting mawkish or sentimental about whatever is triggering the memories. Watching Bayley and Murdoch's house deteriorate along with Iris' mind is an interesting touch. While some of the situations may come off as movie-of-the-week type moments, they are acted with such professionalism and talent, I can easily overlook them. I am not saying Iris did not wander off, or eventually forget her own husband, I just feel those scenes could have been presented in a new way.

I have never seen two actors play one character so well as Broadbent and Bonneville as John. I sometimes could not tell they were two different people. Likewise with Iris and John's friend Janet, played younger by Juliet Aubrey and older by Penelope Wilton. The stricken couple's reaction to a major character's death and funeral are sad disasters that not many normal people could have handled.

Judi Dench and Kate Winslet do not look enough alike to get the same reaction out of me that Bonneville and Broadbent did, but that does not lessen the effectiveness of their performances. Dench does a fantastic job, going from intellectual to mute disease victim so fast, no one would know how to react to something this tragic. Winslet is also good as the free spirit, but my main problem was with the earlier life scenes.

I love films and books about writers and the writing process, and I would have liked to see more background on Iris Murdoch and what she wrote. I am not saying her suffering was lessened because I did not get to know her as well, but more hints into her personal life and writing would have been rewarding. The film runs a mere ninety minutes, when another half hour could have been added easily. When was the last time you wished a film could be lengthened?

My grandfather, a philosophy professor, died of Alzheimer's and assorted complications from a series of strokes. I did not see him in the last six years of his life, I want to remember him taking me fishing at the muddy pond on the little bit of land he owned, or sitting in his study at his home and looking through encyclopedias. I helped him move his books from his office at Baylor University to the back of his two car garage, noticing titles that I would never understand on a subject I could not fathom. We all want to have a moment back, a few seconds to tell people we have lost how we feel and how much we miss them. Alzheimer's is a horrible disease, because the person is physically there, but not mentally. It is a disgusting disorder, and I would not wish it on my worst enemy.

"Iris"'s pain is raw. The directing and performances are strong. The film makers should have let us get to know Iris and John better, to more fully appreciate his loss and literature's loss. I will probably hunt down Bayley's books, to find out more on the subjects. I do recommend the film.

link directly to this review at http://www.efilmcritic.com/review.php?movie=5668&reviewer=325
originally posted: 02/05/04 04:12:12
[printer] printer-friendly format  

User Comments

8/13/10 PAUL SHORTT INTRIGUING DRAMA WITH GREAT PERFORMANCES 4 stars
8/05/09 Billy I wouldn't watch this shit if I were you 1 stars
9/19/06 marlina truly boring . overly filled with depressing scenes... 2 stars
6/15/04 T. Maj Unrelentingly depressing. No one over 60 should see it 2 stars
3/24/04 Margie another great performance from dame dench, and jim broadbent couldn't have been better. 4 stars
1/20/04 Charles Tatum Well acted, but too short 4 stars
6/11/03 Mystique Broadbent ...wow...Dench ..wow and the movie ....wow... 5 stars
5/01/03 Andrew Carden Dench Is Perfect (As Usual...), but This Film Is Boring and Tiredsome. Winslet Is Miscast. 2 stars
3/11/03 Shadaan Felfeli Great film for a discerning audiance.Giving Halle Berry the oscar over Dench was a travesty 5 stars
11/16/02 Big Ted An Oscar for Dench, Broadbent, Winslet, and Bonneville, please! 5 stars
9/29/02 Peter Sherlock It's more about Dench and Broadbent than Murdoch. A good try. 3 stars
8/27/02 ownerofdajoint agreatviewofalzheimers 5 stars
6/09/02 natasha Jim Broadbent broke my heart in this 4 stars
4/05/02 Teresa Brilliant. More a celebration of a life than the sad story I expected. 4 stars
3/17/02 rajeshjha spellbound 5 stars
3/12/02 spaceworm Oscar Scmoscer. Say something intelligent! (It's Broadbent's film anyway.) 5 stars
3/08/02 Robert Greg is smoking crack. This is a truly beautiful movie. Geeky guy gets hot, smart girl! 5 stars
3/05/02 jann Judi Dench is brilliant .. as usual. She should get the Oscar. Outstanding. 5 stars
3/01/02 Pierce Lanson Not for young people. Brilliant acting. Judi will get the Oscar(1/3/02 5 stars
2/27/02 swanand its very good to see 5 stars
2/01/02 matthew smith a moving and ultimately a touching experience 4 stars
1/25/02 jamuna nice 5 stars
1/23/02 Andrew Benson This is a seriously important and beautiful movie. 5 stars
IF YOU'VE SEEN THIS FILM, RATE IT!
Note: Duplicate, 'planted,' or other obviously improper comments
will be deleted at our discretion. So don't bother posting 'em. Thanks!
Your Name:
Your Comments:
Your Location: (state/province/country)
Your Rating:


Discuss this movie in our forum

USA
  15-Feb-2002 (R)
  DVD: 20-Aug-2002

UK
  N/A

Australia
  31-Jan-2002




Home Reviews  Articles  Release Dates Coming Soon  DVD  Top 20s Criticwatch  Search
Public Forums  Festival Coverage  Contests About 
eFilmCritic.com: Australia's Largest Movie Review Database.
Privacy Policy | HBS Inc. | |   

All data and site design copyright 1997-2017, HBS Entertainment, Inc.
Search for
reviews features movie title writer/director/cast