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Overall Rating
3.45

Awesome: 0%
Worth A Look72.73%
Average: 9.09%
Pretty Bad: 9.09%
Total Crap: 9.09%

1 review, 5 user ratings


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Habit
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by Greg Muskewitz

"Modern vampyrism."
4 stars

Larry Fessenden’s take on Dracula, with himself in the lead as an unassuming guy who meets a mysterious girl at a party.

She remains elusive and purposely cryptic towards him (“I suspect the less you know about me, the longer you’ll wanna be around”) because of her penchant for blood. At first it isn’t clear-cut if the sanguisuge is using him or if there is a genuine attraction. However, as the protagonist starts to deteriorate in unexpected ways and begins to alienate himself from his friends, the issue at hand is defogged. One of the biggest differences — that which sets this movie apart from the prior effort — is the clearing in which Fessenden has to purport his tale. He doesn’t box himself into a corner that he must shock his way out of, or at least attempt to. With Habit, there’s a departure from the caked-on camp of No Telling insofar as this story is approached in a far more serious manner. Self-righteousness is a drag, but Fessenden heeds pretension. He ably builds suspense, tension, fear and atmosphere; one of the strongest components is in the voluble formation of the dialogue. Made on a relatively low-budget, the movie adeptly transitions from build-up to delivery, recovery, more build-up, an eruption, and so on. The pace that is put forth is a ricochet that echoes, or bounces, throughout. The rhythm at which the movie is advanced by, is undeniably the cornerstone that keeps it moving, but the intelligence is what prompts any following inertia.

With Meredith Snaider, Aaron Beall, and Patricia Coleman.

[Absolutely to be seen.]

link directly to this review at http://www.efilmcritic.com/review.php?movie=6206&reviewer=172
originally posted: 10/06/02 12:41:30
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User Comments

4/02/08 mr.mike Unusual handling of the material , I mildly recommend it. 3 stars
10/22/06 Jim Off-beat vampire semi-porn whackfest 4 stars
10/31/05 Deven A great change in the typical Vampire venue. I enjoyed Meredith Snaider ... what's happene 4 stars
5/20/05 E-FUNK Reading that review was like sitting through a lecture about fungus taught by Tony Blair. 1 stars
11/08/02 K-Ronik I didn't understand a word of that review, but the movie blew. 2 stars
IF YOU'VE SEEN THIS FILM, RATE IT!
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USA
  14-Nov-1997

UK
  N/A

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