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Overall Rating
3.38

Awesome: 12.5%
Worth A Look: 12.5%
Average75%
Pretty Bad: 0%
Total Crap: 0%

1 review, 2 user ratings


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I Capture the Castle
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by Greg Muskewitz

"Imagines itself of a pedigree far, far out of reach."
3 stars

TV-grade movie based on Dodie Smith’s novel about the bedlam family of a has-been writer, living impecuniously passive until the two of-age daughters vie for the affection of a bourgeoisie young man.

The older daughter (Rose Byrne), more traditionally pretty, also seeks out his attention more conventionally, making it obvious that she’s after his wealth and status, foregoing the necessity of love (“I’d marry a chimpanzee if he had money”). On the opposite side is the younger daughter (Romola Garai), sweetly sensual, coy, and literate-minded (she wants to be a writer also, as verbalized through her voiceover narrative diary) who finds love by mistake. The tragedy of the thing is supposed to be in the vicissitudes of misplaced love. Apart from some nice work done by Garai (especially impressive) and Byrne, the movie plays as a beginner’s version of a literary piece, dealing specifically with making literature. Compare it to Swimming Pool, where the writer is carefully examined in her environment and over her meticulous routine, with subtle skills shown by Ozon in the construction of plot and pace; I Capture the Castle is a failed abecedarian attempt, the whole while far too conscious and obvious about the conventions of writing, as well as its own “literature.” Directed by Tim Fywell; with Bill Nighy, Tara Fitzgerald, Henry Cavill, Henry Thomas, and Sinead Cusack.

[See it if you must.]

link directly to this review at http://www.efilmcritic.com/review.php?movie=7767&reviewer=172
originally posted: 04/23/04 22:22:47
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OFFICIAL SELECTION: 2003 Seattle Film Festival. For more in the 2003 Seattle Film Festival series, click here.
OFFICIAL SELECTION: 2003 Palm Springs Film Festival. For more in the 2003 Palm Springs Film Festival series, click here.

User Comments

9/24/03 Robbie Hawkwind Great example of how to make a romantic movie that transcends the nature of the genre 4 stars
8/04/03 Double G awesome 5 stars
IF YOU'VE SEEN THIS FILM, RATE IT!
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USA
  11-Jul-2003

UK
  N/A

Australia
  10-Jul-2003 (PG)


Directed by
  Tim Fywell

Written by
  Heidi Thomas

Cast
  Romola Garai
  Rose Byrne
  Henry Thomas
  Marc Blucas



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